Indigenous Canadians: Success Stories

Many regulated career colleges in Canada have been working to build relationships with indigenous communities. Here are just some examples of success stories of Indigenous Canadians attending career colleges:

Student and Teacher Success Stories: Grace Dove – Vancouver Film School, 2011

• Originally from the Canim Lake Indian Band in Northern British Columbia
• Graduated from the Acting for Film & Television program
• Starred in the 2016 Oscar Nominated Movie, “The Revenant”

Victoria Kakuktinniq – MC College, 2012

• Victoria was born in Rankin Inlet, Nunavut and had been taught how to sew traditional garments
• She was inspired to start a career in fashion, and enrolled in the Fashion Design and Apparel production program
• She launched her own business, “Victoria’ Arctic Fashion”, and was named the 2015 Business of the Year at the Nunavut Trade Show

Sherry Bragg- Discovery Community College

• Sherry is of Cree/Sioux descent and is an Acknowledged Elder of the Pine Ridge Reservation in BC
• She teaches in the Community Support Worker program and is the 2015 BCCCA Excellence in Teaching Award winner
• Sherry goes above and beyond to help her students succeed, and ensures that educational programs promote indigenous knowledge and diversity

Training Success Stories: Willis College – Minwaashin Lodge

• For 8 years, Willis College and Minwaashin Lodge have been running the “Courage to Soar” program
• The program targets at-risk indigenous women and provides a textbook and tuition scholarship for the Office Administration program
• Over 130 indigenous women have gone through this program with tremendous success

Louis Riel Vocational College

• Louis Riel Vocational College is an indigenous focused college, most training is done right in the local communities
• All students, indigenous or not, must take Indigenous Culture and History training

Academy Canada

• Since 2003, Academy Canada has partnered with local Innu communities to provide training programs
• They have had 71 indigenous graduates in 3 apprenticeship programs since 2003, but they have also partnered with local communities to provide other training programs
• An important aspect of this partnership, is consulting and listening to Innu leaders on how to modify and enhance
training