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Initiative News

Addressing the Issue of Foreign Credential Recognition: Career Colleges Increase Newcomer Outreach in Atlantic Canada

HALIFAX – November 19, 2014 – Today, the National Association of Career Colleges (NACC) announced that it is expanding its outreach activities under the Alternative Career Pathways (ACP) initiative in Atlantic Canada.

Immigrant-serving organizations and NACC member colleges in Atlantic Canada will collaborate to deliver information through seminars, workshops and resources. In Halifax, NACC was particularly pleased to meet with local organizations who are working on the ground with newcomers to help them achieve their goals, including the Immigrant Settlement Association of Nova Scotia, Greater Halifax Partnership and FUSION Halifax.

“Atlantic Canada, and Halifax specifically, continues to attract educated and skilled immigrants who leave behind their careers to start a new life in Canada,” said Serge Buy, NACC’s CEO. “Upon arrival, they may discover that their training is not recognized, and they are unaware of the various career paths available to them. Our goal through this initiative is to be a helpful resource that shows newcomers the link between their existing skills and related career opportunities.”

“As a registered career college, we know how challenging it can be for newcomers to work in their fields once here in Canada,” said Jennifer Stuart, Executive Director of the Canadian College of Massage and Hydrotherapy. “ACP is a fantastic way for us to connect with organizations here in Halifax who are working to give internationally-trained professions an opportunity to find training and pursue a career in a field they are passionate about.”

NACC’s decision to increase its activities is in response to the consistent flow of skilled immigrants whose foreign credentials are not fully recognized in Canada.  Canada is home to ever-increasing numbers of internationally-trained individuals, but these professionals face multiple challenges to working in Canada.  From having difficulty with regulatory barriers and credential recognition, to dealing with the time and cost of re-training and the pressures of providing for a family, newcomers need a quicker path to Canadian training and the job market.

The ACP initiative, launched earlier this year by NACC with the support of the Government of Canada, is working nationally to provide these pathways, allowing individuals to make the best use of their previous training and gain employment in alternative careers.

About NACC

Established in 1896, the National Association of Career Colleges (NACC) is the oldest post-secondary association in Canada, representing almost 500 career colleges across the country.  All NACC members meet the highest regulatory standards, ensuring the best possible education for their students.

Visit www.nacc.ca for more information.  Follow us on Twitter @NACCCanada.

 

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For more information or to schedule an interview with Serge Buy, contact:

Alyson Queen
Director of Outreach | Alternative Career Pathways Suite 270, 44 Byward Market Square Ottawa, ON | K1N 7A2
613-581-0531 | aqueen@nacc.ca


New to Edmonton? Looking For Your Next Job? We Can Help.

The National Association of Career Colleges is pleased to join a number of local immigrant-serving organizations at an Open House in Edmonton on Wednesday, November 12, providing newcomers with the opportunity to learn about training and career opportunities in their area.

This Open House is being presented as a part of the Alternative Career Pathways (ACP) initiative, that connects newcomers with information on training opportunities at Canada’s career colleges, in order to obtain employment in a new or existing field.

Event Details
November 12, 2014 – 4:00pm – 8:00pm
St. John’s Cultural Centre
10611 – 110 Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta

For more information on the event, contact Christopher Powell at edmonton@nacc.ca or (780) 497-3167.

For more information on ACP and how we can help, visit www.nacc.ca/acp or call 1-866-981-6863.


CEO_Logo_CLR_Tagline                       NACC Colour Logo2000

TORONTO, August 11, 2014 – Career Edge and NACC have joined forces to connect internationally qualified professionals (IQPs) with leading organizations to help re-launch careers in Canada.

The partnership’s pilot program, NACC Edge, is an alternative career pathway that aims to help IQPs find relevant work in their area of expertise by using their Canadian-obtained training and skills. After completing a training program at an NACC member career college, program graduates can re-launch their careers in Canada through Career Edge’s paid internships in related occupations.

The paid internship program focuses on opportunities in various sectors, such as information technology (IT), administration, and health care. Many IQPs join the program in order to enter regulated professions within these fields. The NACC Edge program enables IQPs to continue working in their field while re-training to meet the needs of the job market.

NACC and Career Edge share a common goal of helping create opportunities for IQPs, giving them a greater chance at finding professional success in Canada, whether through education and training programs or through career-related work experience.

“NACC’s members are very excited to see this partnership come into effect,” said Serge Buy, NACC’s Chief Executive Officer. “This is one concrete step we can take toward reducing the challenges faced by IQPs when they seek to obtain work experiences in their fields.”

Canada’s labour force has experienced a growing number of underutilized workers who resort to accepting “survival jobs” to stay afloat when they are faced with a job market that seldom recognizes their international experience and accreditation. The NACC Edge program seeks to address this pressing issue by ensuring IQPs are integrated into Canada’s workforce, so that they are working to their full potential, while strengthening Canada’s globally competitive economy.

“We are very proud to partner with NACC,” says Naguib Gouda, President of Career Edge. “Through this partnership, we’re giving more options to newcomers who are struggling to acquire Canadian work experience that aligns with their career goals,” he says.

NACC Edge is available across the country and is delivered by NACC’s Regional Coordinators in Vancouver, Edmonton, and Toronto, and will be supported by staff at the NACC national office in Ottawa and Career Edge’s headquarters in Toronto.

 

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About Career Edge

A self-sustaining social enterprise, Career Edge has remained passionate about connecting highly motivated, well-qualified interns with leading organizations since 1996. Our innovative internship programs provide cost-effective and virtually risk free workforce solutions to help multi- sector enterprises meet or exceed evolving business needs, while giving new graduates— including those with disabilities—and internationally qualified professions the edge they need to successfully launch their careers.

Career Edge works. Half of our interns are hired by the employer at the end of the internship and most of the rest launch their career elsewhere within six months. Count on us for your short and long-term employment needs.

About NACC
Established in 1896, the National Association of Career Colleges (NACC) is the oldest post- secondary association in Canada, representing more than 500 career colleges across the country. All NACC members meet the highest regulatory standards, ensuring the best possible education for their students.

Alternative Career Pathways is a program launched by the NACC to help match IQPs with training programs at career colleges so they can leverage their existing skills, training and experience in Canada’s workforce. It provides information and establishes relationships with career colleges, employers, and immigrant-serving organizations, all committed to helping internationally-trained individuals

Media Contact:

Career Edge
Charmaine O’Connor
Manager, Marketing & Communications
coconnor@careeredge.ca
Tel: (416) 977-3343 ext. 286
Fax: (416) 977-4090
For more information about Career Edge, please visit www.careeredge.ca

National Association of Career Colleges
Nelly Leonidis
Communications Manager
Alternative Career Pathways
Suite 270, 44 Byward Market Square Ottawa, ON
K1N 7A2
1-866-981-6863
nleonidis@nacc.ca


 

View NACC’s LIVE press conference with the Hon. Jason Kenney, P.C., M.P., federal Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister for Multiculturalism (press conference begins at 11:00am ET, Friday February 7, 2014).

RELEASE - February 7, 2014

Minister Jason Kenney Announces Funding for NACC’s Alternative Career Pathways Initiative

(Toronto) – At a joint press conference today with the Hon. Jason Kenney, P.C., M.P., federal Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister for Multiculturalism, Serge Buy, Chief Executive Officer of the National Association of Career Colleges (NACC), launched a new initiative to help internationally-trained individuals who are having challenges working in their chosen field in Canada.  At the event Minister Kenney announced that the Government of Canada will be providing financial support for the project.

The Government of Canada funding will allow NACC to deliver the Alternative Career Pathways initiative, which helps match internationally-trained individuals who are facing challenges working in their field with training programs at career colleges so they can make use of their existing skills and training in related and meaningful careers.

“Today’s funding announcement marks the first step in an exciting project that we hope will allow thousands of newcomers to get the training they need to enter the Canadian workforce,” said Mr. Buy. “We are looking forward to using career colleges’ proven ability to provide competitive, cost-effective, and timely programs to help newcomers find alternative careers that build on their skills, experience, and interests.”

The Alternative Career Pathways initiative will be delivered by Regional Coordinators in Vancouver (British Columbia), Edmonton (Prairie Provinces), Toronto (Ontario), and Montreal (Québec & Atlantic Provinces), and will be supported by staff at NACC’s national office in Ottawa.

“We are committed to helping highly-skilled newcomers find jobs related to their fields,” added Mr. Buy. “We look forward to providing pathways to high-quality education and speedy employment for people who want to use their skills and training to work.  We want newcomers to be able to use their skills as soon as possible in Canada and work to their full potential.”

The National Association of Career Colleges acknowledges and thanks Minister Kenney and the Government of Canada for their support toward the success of the Alternative Career Pathways initiative.  This project is funded by the Government of Canada’s Foreign Credential Recognition Program.

About NACC

Established in 1896, the National Association of Career Colleges (NACC) is the oldest post-secondary association in Canada, representing almost 500 career colleges across the country.  All NACC members meet the highest standards, ensuring the best possible education for their students.

Visit www.nacc.ca and www.careercollegepathways.ca.  Follow us on Twitter @NACC_.

For media enquiries, contact:

Serge Buy, Chief Executive Officer
By email: sbuy@nacc.ca
By phone: 613-800-0340

For all other enquiries, contact:          

Kristina Price
Project Manager, Alternative Career Pathways
By email: kprice@nacc.ca
By phone: 1-866-981-6863


 

Backgrounder – Alternative Career Pathways

February 7, 2014

Alternative Careers

Alternative careers are career options other than the occupation in which the individual was originally trained, but that ideally use the person’s existing skills and experience.  These alternative careers, in many cases, involve working in occupations that are not regulated.

In most regulated occupations, internationally-trained individuals have to go through several steps to meet a province’s licensing requirements.  The cost of licensing exams, training, and skills upgrading can be costly in both time and money, and many internationally-trained individuals face the prospect of starting their career or education again if their qualifications do not meet the requirements of their occupation in Canada.

For some newcomers, alternative careers are sought to support themselves while pursuing licensure in a occupation that is regulated in Canada. For others who are unable to achieve licensure or who are unable to find employment in their field once qualified, the alternative career may be a stepping stone to other careers, or become the end goal of the individual. In all cases, alternative careers improve the labour market integration prospects of new immigrants by providing opportunities to apply their skills and experience in a Canadian context.

Alternative Career Pathways Initiative

The Alternative Career Pathways initiative will help match internationally-trained individuals who are facing challenges working in their field with training programs at career colleges so they can make use of their existing skills and training in related and meaningful careers.  The Alternative Career Pathways initiative will provide information and establish relationships with career colleges, employers, and immigrant-serving organizations, all aimed at helping newcomers to Canada.

Information on alternate career options offered through career colleges can help internationally-trained individuals make better informed decisions concerning their career options, skills updating, education and planning.

This project will build upon the proven abilities of career colleges to provide high-quality, cost-effective, and timely skills training programs that meet the needs of the labour market.

The Alternative Career Pathways initiative will be delivered by Regional Coordinators in Vancouver (British Columbia), Edmonton (Prairie Provinces), Toronto (Ontario), and Montreal (Québec & Atlantic Provinces), and will be supported by staff at the NACC national office in Ottawa.

The Alternative Career Pathways initiative is being funded by the Government of Canada’s Foreign Credential Recognition Program.

Career Colleges

Since the 1800’s, career colleges have been a key part of the Canadian educational landscape, providing students with the skills needed to access the workforce and providing employers with skilled employees.

Career colleges are uniquely positioned to offer excellent services and are able to adapt quickly to labour market changes, altering existing programs and creating new ones to fit areas facing labour market shortages, and offering programs that train and prepare students for a meaningful career in their chosen fields.  A C.D. Howe Report on education stated that the ability of career colleges to respond rapidly to demands for training enhances labour market flexibility.

It is not only the quality of instruction that appeals to students but also the smaller class sizes, flexible schedules, and compressed length of study. Private career colleges efficiently provide their students with the necessary skills to fill industry voids; the majority of programs are accelerated and take less than one year to complete, minimizing time students are absent from the workforce.

National Association of Career Colleges

Established in 1896, the National Association of Career Colleges (NACC) is the oldest post-secondary association in Canada, representing almost 500 career colleges across the country.  All NACC members meet the highest standards, ensuring the best possible education for their students.

NACC members must be registered with the appropriate provincial government department.  All registered career colleges are required to abide by strict provincial regulations to ensure quality education standards.  Provincial requirements include regular reporting, compliance with operating regulations, program reviews, and study compensation funds.  In addition, the provincial ministries governing career colleges recognize certain accrediting agencies that have established standards to improve the quality of education in private career colleges.

NACC is dedicated to ensuring that our members adhere to all regulations in order to protect students.

Visit www.nacc.ca and www.careercollegepathways.ca.  Follow us on Twitter @NACC_.


 

Backgrounder – Foreign Credential Recognition

February 7, 2014

NACC encourages provincial governments to continue making progress toward better processes and harmonization of requirements for the recognition of foreign credentials.  Newcomers to Canada, and individuals with international training and credentials, still face significant barriers to credential recognition.

Different Standards Across Provinces

  • Each province maintains a different number of regulated occupations and recognized trades, and licenses or certification are required to work in these fields.
  • Differences in requirements for licensure and certification still exist between provinces.
  • These differences make it difficult for newcomers to work in their fields in Canada.
  • In most regulated occupations, internationally-trained newcomers must go through several steps to meet a province’s licensing requirements.
  • The cost of licensing exams, training, and skills upgrading can be both lengthy and costly.
  • Many internationally-trained newcomers face the prospect of starting their career or education again if their qualifications do not meet their province’s requirements.

Training for Alternative Careers

  • Alternative careers are career options that make use of a newcomer’s skills and experience that are closely related to the occupation in which they were originally trained.
  • For some newcomers, alternative careers are used to support themselves and their families while pursuing licensure in a regulated profession.
  • For others who are unable to achieve recognition or find employment in their field once qualified, an alternative career may be a stepping stone to other careers, or the end goal.
  • Regardless, alternative careers improve the labour market integration prospects of newcomers by providing opportunities to apply their skills and experience in a Canadian context, to learn new skills, and to gain further experience.

Career Colleges can Assist Newcomers

  • Career colleges can assist newcomers in training for alternative careers to make use of their existing skills and training to enter the workforce.
  • Career colleges have a proven ability to provide high-quality, cost-effective, and short-duration skills training programs that meet the needs of students and employers.
  • Career colleges are uniquely positioned to adapt quickly to labour market changes by altering existing programs and creating new ones to fit employer and labour market needs.

 

This project is funded by the Government of Canada’s Foreign Credential Recognition Program.

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